Home lifestyle Amazing pictures from British photographer Alastair Philip Wiper’s new book -…

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Amazing pictures from British photographer Alastair Philip Wiper’s new book -…

by Ace Damon
Amazing pictures from British photographer Alastair Philip Wiper's new book -...

They say that beauty is in the eye of the beholder.

And for some, this principle may seem particularly suitable for British photographer Alastair Philip Wiper’s new book – Unintended beauty.

He sets out to challenge the common perception of beauty with Wiper's photographic eyes sweeping scenes that are not normally considered aesthetically pleasing by the world of industry and science.

"Something I want to do is challenge what people think is beautiful," says Wiper, "because there are many things you can say are ugly and beautiful at the same time. Many beautiful things must have a little ugliness to them.

do you agree with him

Scroll down and watch a selection of images from the book of a giant knitting machine, a slaughterhouse and more.

Aurora Nordic medical cannabis greenhouse, Denmark: Mads Pedersen, a third generation tomato producer, owns Scandinavia's largest tomato-growing empire, Alfred Pedersen & Sons, explains the book. Around 2015, Mads realized that his infrastructure and knowledge could be applied to the cultivation of medical cannabis. Mads' new idea coincided with a huge wave of Danish public interest – and political debate – about medical cannabis, and when his plans were coming to fruition, the Danish parliament started issuing trial licenses to produce medical cannabis. Mads bought the first and started building a 60,000 square meter facility, the largest in Europe

Horsens slaughterhouse in Denmark, Denmark: completed in 2004, this slaughterhouse kills approximately 100,000 pigs a week, according to the book, making it one of the largest in the world. It employs 1,420 people and receives around 150 visitors a day. The slaughterhouse was designed with the opening in mind - all stages of production, from the pigs that arrive to the slaughterhouse itself, the butcher and the packaging, can be seen in an observation gallery

Horsens slaughterhouse in Denmark, Denmark: completed in 2004, this slaughterhouse kills approximately 100,000 pigs a week, according to the book, making it one of the largest in the world. It employs 1,420 people and receives around 150 visitors a day. The slaughterhouse was designed with the opening in mind – all stages of production, from the pigs that arrive to the slaughterhouse itself, the butcher and the packaging, can be seen in an observation gallery

Circular knitting machine at the Innofa textile factory in Kvadrat Febrik, The Netherlands: The Dutch company Kvadrat Febrik has an impressive circular knitting machine, the books reveal, which has about 4,000 small needles for knitting wool in a continuous loop without seams - the fabric is cut to create a wide, flat piece of fabric & # 39;

Circular knitting machine at the Innofa textile factory in Kvadrat Febrik, The Netherlands: The Dutch company Kvadrat Febrik has an impressive circular knitting machine, the books reveal, which has about 4,000 small needles for knitting wool in a continuous loop without seams – the fabric is cut to create a wide, flat piece of fabric & # 39;

Plywood model of part of the Atlas detector, Cern, Switzerland: The Atlas detector is the largest of seven detectors in the Large Hadron Collider, and this model of a small part of the detector was used to test wiring scenarios before installation . I found it at the bottom of a warehouse, accumulating dust & # 39; reveals Alastair

Plywood model of part of the Atlas detector, Cern, Switzerland: The Atlas detector is the largest of seven detectors in the Large Hadron Collider, and this model of a small part of the detector was used to test wiring scenarios before installation . I found it at the bottom of a warehouse, accumulating dust & # 39; reveals Alastair

Solar oven in Odeillo, France: Unintended Beauty says that this solar oven opened in 1970 and is the largest in the world, working on the same principle as its smaller and older brother, on the same street. The sun's energy is reflected through a series of 9,600 mirrors and concentrated in a very small spot to create extremely high temperatures, he explains. It is still used by space agencies like NASA and ESA, as well as scientists and technology companies to research the effects of extremely high temperatures on certain materials for nuclear reactors and re-entry of space vehicles, and to produce hydrogen and nanoparticles. In this photo, the gray structure in the center of the reflector matrix is ​​where the sun's rays are focused on a point the size of a pan, where temperatures reach 3,500 ° C

Solar oven in Odeillo, France: Unintended Beauty says that this solar oven opened in 1970 and is the largest in the world, working on the same principle as its smaller and older brother, on the same street. The sun's energy is reflected through a series of 9,600 mirrors and concentrated in a very small spot to create extremely high temperatures, he explains. It is still used by space agencies like NASA and ESA, as well as scientists and technology companies to research the effects of extremely high temperatures on certain materials for nuclear reactors and re-entry of space vehicles, and to produce hydrogen and nanoparticles. In this photo, the gray structure in the center of the reflector matrix is ​​where the sun's rays are focused on a point the size of a pan, where temperatures reach 3,500 ° C

Maersk Triple E container ship under construction, Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering, South Korea: Mr. Wiper explains that when it was built, the Maersk Triple E was the largest container ship in the world, with a capacity of 18,000 containers - enough space to transport 864 million bananas. He continues: & # 39; Twelve of these ships were at different stages of construction when I visited the DSME shipyard, where 46,000 people are building about 100 ships and oil platforms at any one time. It could reasonably be described as the largest Legoland in the world. The ships are built in sections called megablocks, which are erected in place with cranes and soldiers together & # 39;

Maersk Triple E container ship under construction, Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering, South Korea: Mr. Wiper explains that when it was built, the Maersk Triple E was the largest container ship in the world, with a capacity of 18,000 containers – enough space to transport 864 million bananas. He continues: & # 39; Twelve of these ships were at different stages of construction when I visited the DSME shipyard, where 46,000 people are building about 100 ships and oil platforms at any one time. It could reasonably be described as the largest Legoland in the world. The ships are built in sections called megablocks, which are erected in place with cranes and soldiers together & # 39;

Absolut Vodka Distillery, Sweden: Founded in 1879, Absolut Vodka is the third largest brand of spirits in the world, the book says, and all of the 99 million liters produced each year are manufactured here in Skåne, in southern Sweden. More than a kilogram of wheat is used in each bottle of Absolut, all grown locally. The wheat is ground, mixed in a mixture with water for three hours, the yeast is added and the mixture fermented for 48 hours, after which the alcohol level is 10%. The mixture is then continuously distilled, and the resulting fine alcohol is 96%. Then it moves to a bottling plant and is diluted to 40%. The 11-storey warehouse in Åhus holds up to 13 million bottles at a time. This image was filmed as part of a project in collaboration with strategic human science consultants ReD Associates

Absolut Vodka Distillery, Sweden: Founded in 1879, Absolut Vodka is the third largest brand of spirits in the world, the book says, and all of the 99 million liters produced each year are manufactured here in Skåne, in southern Sweden. More than a kilogram of wheat is used in each bottle of Absolut, all grown locally. The wheat is ground, mixed in a mixture with water for three hours, the yeast is added and the mixture fermented for 48 hours, after which the alcohol level is 10%. The mixture is then continuously distilled, and the resulting fine alcohol is 96%. Then it moves to a bottling plant and is diluted to 40%. The 11-storey warehouse in Åhus holds up to 13 million bottles at a time. This image was filmed as part of a project in collaboration with strategic human science consultants ReD Associates

British photographer Alastair Philip Wiper (photo in a self-portrait) says: & # 39; The title of the book Unintended Beauty should be a little provocative. Many beautiful things must have a little ugliness to them & # 39;

British photographer Alastair Philip Wiper (photo in a self-portrait) says: & # 39; The title of the book Unintended Beauty should be a little provocative. Many beautiful things must have a little ugliness to them & # 39;

Unintended beauty is published by Hatje Cantz, priced at 44 euros (£ 38)

Unintended beauty is published by Hatje Cantz, priced at 44 euros (£ 38)

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