Home lifestyle Former soldier Jordan Wylie rows solo across the world’s most dangerous body of…

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Former soldier Jordan Wylie rows solo across the world’s most dangerous body of…

by Ace Damon
Rowing: Jordan celebrates rowing soil in the most dangerous body of water in the world - the Bab al-Mandab Strait. He is portrayed at his final point in Ras Siyyan, Djibouti. Jordan said he was surrounded by sharks when this picture was taken on October 4

A former UK soldier and extreme adventurer has become the first person in history to successfully paddle solo, unsupported and unarmed in the most dangerous body of water on the planet.

Jordan Wylie, one of the stars of Channel 4's Hunted and Celebrity Hunted, crossed the Pirate-infested (also known as the Portal of Tears) Bab-el-Mandeb Strait on October 4 from Djibouti to Yemen and vice -verse, on a tiring trip that took 13 hours and 42 minutes.

Jordan is a hardened military man who served from 2000 to 2009 at the king's Royal Hussars and has participated in marathons in Iraq, Somalia and Afghanistan. But he said of the rowing challenge: "It was the hardest thing I ever did."

Rowing: Jordan celebrates rowing soil in the most dangerous body of water in the world – the Bab al-Mandab Strait. He is portrayed at his final point in Ras Siyyan, Djibouti. Jordan said he was surrounded by sharks when this picture was taken on October 4

The Bab-el-Mandeb Strait (also known as the Gate of Tears) - pictured - is notorious not only for piracy but for terrorism; smuggling of people, weapons and narcotics - and it's one of the busiest sea lanes in the world

The Bab-el-Mandeb Strait (also known as the Gate of Tears) – pictured – is notorious not only for piracy but for terrorism; smuggling of people, weapons and narcotics – and it's one of the busiest sea lanes in the world

He rowed at temperatures of 38 ° C, suffered sunburn and dehydration and spent four days with diarrhea and being physically ill while preparing for the trip to a remote camp in Khôr & Angar, where fish caught daily in the strait .

But he says that in retrospect, "it was all part of the adventure."

One of Jordan's main motivations was to raise money for three charities – Frontline Children, Epilepsy action and Seafarers UK – and to help fund the construction of a war refugee school in Asyla, Djibouti.

But while the challenge was for charity, the UK Foreign and Commonwealth Ministry advised him not to accept it. And that's understandable because anyone rowing across the strait faces considerable risks.

First and foremost, this strategic waterway is notorious not only for piracy but for terrorism; smuggling of people, weapons and narcotics – and it's one of the busiest sea lanes in the world.

This photo shows Jordan with his local fixer, connecting cameras and technology to the boat in Djibouti City. This is where the boat was delivered. He was then towed by boat to the starting point for the Jordan challenge - Khôr & Angar. Jordan traveled in a 4x4 to the starting point, which took 17 hours. He said towing the boat ashore may have attracted unwanted attention from authorities.

This photo shows Jordan with his local fixer, connecting cameras and technology to the boat in Djibouti City. This is where the boat was delivered. He was then towed by boat to the starting point for the Jordan challenge – Khôr & Angar. Jordan traveled in a 4×4 to the starting point, which took 17 hours. He said towing the boat ashore may have attracted unwanted attention from authorities.

Jordan explained to MailOnline Travel that troublemakers in the area tend to zoom into skiffs of up to 30 or 40 knots without light – and departed from Khôr & Angar at 4 am when it was dark.

So he had a lot to worry about.

But then Jordan is skilled in the art of avoiding trouble.

Jordan in Khôr & Angar before leaving. Jordan spent 10 days in the country monitoring the tides and security situation in advance

Jordan in Khôr & Angar before leaving. Jordan spent 10 days in the country monitoring the tides and security situation in advance

He made a great effort in planning the operation.

He said: ‘There were many logistical challenges. I spent 10 days in the country monitoring vessel traffic, monitoring tides and sea states and, of course, the ever-changing security situation.

Also I also had a VHF radio that was tuned to Channel 16 in the High Risk Area and could regularly hear commercial ship captains warning other vessels about suspicious small boats in the area. Obviously that made me very nervous.

& # 39; I received daily excellent intelligence updates regularly from "Gray Page", a leading British maritime safety consultancy, who provided me with information on suspicious activity, current threats, the situation in Yemen and so on, as well as maintaining regular communications. via satellite communication with "Eton Harris," a UAE-based company that sponsored this project.

Jordan has trained extensively for 12 months with some of the rowing's biggest names, including double Olympic champion Alex Gregory MBE and fellow Olympic medalist James Foad.

Jordan has trained extensively for 12 months with some of the rowing's biggest names, including double Olympic champion Alex Gregory MBE and fellow Olympic medalist James Foad.

This image shows a container ship going down the Red Sea before crossing the Strait to the Gulf of Aden.

This image shows a container ship going down the Red Sea before crossing the Strait to the Gulf of Aden.

Jordan technical support for the trip. He said: “I had a VHF radio that was tuned to Channel 16 in the high-risk area and could regularly hear commercial ship captains warning other vessels about suspicious small boats in the area.

Jordan technical support for the trip. He said: “I had a VHF radio that was tuned to Channel 16 in the high-risk area and could regularly hear commercial ship captains warning other vessels about suspicious small boats in the area.

"It should also be noted that Saudi Arabia announced a partial ceasefire in the region I was rowing on the day before the match, which was a stroke of good luck."

While in the water, it was just Jordan, the intense sun and the great currents.

The end point was Ras Siyyan, on the coast, across Perim Island in Yemen.

Khôr & Angar camp in Jordan passed four days before facing its rowing challenge. Here he ate fresh fish every day - but suffered from diarrhea and was physically ill.

Khôr & Angar camp in Jordan passed four days before facing its rowing challenge. Here he ate fresh fish every day – but suffered from diarrhea and was physically ill.

Daily Diet: Freshly caught fish by camp manager Mohammed Ali Omar

Daily Diet: Freshly caught fish by camp manager Mohammed Ali Omar

The UK Ministry of Foreign and Commonwealth advised Jordan to row the strait

The UK Ministry of Foreign and Commonwealth advised Jordan to row the strait

He continued: “I was completely unarmed and unsupported – at sea – but I had photographer Stephen McGrath documenting and tracking me and also a small local team of a repairman, a driver and a local Djibouti guide who ensured I had no problems walking towards the Eritrean border in northern Djibouti.

& # 39; The day the sea conditions were very favorable on the way to Yemen, but on the way back, I struggled with some currents of fat in the scorching heat of 38 degrees and suffered from excessive dehydration for the next two days. – and my hands are completely blistered too.

Were There were some difficult times when I was approached by gunmen in fast boats, but fortunately for me they were coast guards protecting Djibouti and Yemen respectively. There were also many small fishing vessels out there, of course I did my best to avoid, because you never know who the bad guys are. We used to say, "Every pirate is also a fisherman, but not every fisherman is also a pirate" …

Boat The boat was built by Rannoch Adventure in the UK and is designed for adventure. They kindly allowed me to present the boat when I ended up at a local rowing club in Djibouti. I also helped with my training plans.

Jordan has trained extensively for 12 months with some of the rowing's biggest names, including double Olympic champion Alex Gregory MBE and fellow Olympic medalist James Foad.

Jordan greets school children in Djibouti. His main motivation for the rowing trip was to raise money for three charities - Frontline Children, Epilepsy Action and Seafarers UK - and to help fund the construction of a war refugee school in Asyla, Djibouti.

Jordan greets school children in Djibouti. His main motivation for the rowing trip was to raise money for three charities – Frontline Children, Epilepsy Action and Seafarers UK – and to help fund the construction of a war refugee school in Asyla, Djibouti.

A photo of the war refugee school in Asyla, where Jordan raised money for

A photo of the war refugee school in Asyla, where Jordan raised money for

He is now feeling ecstatic with all the hard work that was worth it.

He said: ‘It was very exciting to reach Ras Siyyan in the end. Two years of planning and 12 months of training. Getting there was magical, and seeing a group of bull sharks on arrival was pretty cool, since Ras Siyyan is a mountain that represents a shark fin.

It was the hardest thing I ever did. But most importantly, the world is aware of the humanitarian crisis in Yemen and the large number of casualties and losses suffered daily by children. These are the completely innocent victims of this conflict and the world needs to do more to protect them. & # 39;

To support Jordan's charity work visit www.jordanwylie.org/charity.

Jordan's new book, Running For My Life, is due to be released Nov. 7 by Biteback.

In Djibouti, Jordan saw dozens of refugees (pictured), many from war-torn Somalia, heading for the coast, hoping to reach Yemen and finally Europe. When their guide spoke to them, it occurred to many that they did not know it was a conflict in Yemen. "They didn't realize they were coming out of the fire and into the frying pan," Jordan said. Refugees such as those pictured will walk six to eight weeks to reach the coast.

In Djibouti, Jordan saw dozens of refugees (pictured), many from war-torn Somalia, heading for the coast, hoping to reach Yemen and finally Europe. When their guide spoke to them, it occurred to many that they did not know it was a conflict in Yemen. "They didn't realize they were coming out of the fire and into the frying pan," Jordan said. Refugees such as those pictured will walk six to eight weeks to reach the coast.

. (tagsToTranslate) dailymail (t) travel (t) travel_news (t) iraq (t) afghanistan

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